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Movement

 

MOVEMENT


    Small Motor Movement
     
PROBLEM   SOLUTION
Decreased ability to rotate, twist, and
grasp knobs and
handles.
1.  Minimize the need to rotate, twist, and grasp.

Provide an alternative to rotating, twisting, and grasping movements, as required by rotary knobs and handles, by substituting more accommodating components such as levers, slides, or pushbuttons.

2.  Provide appropriately sized components.

Use largest appropriate diameter for functional components such as knobs and handles.

Eliminate or minimize "hard" and "thin" edges on all grasping surfaces. The longer a form must be grasped (e.g., luggage handles), the "softer" and "flatter" the form must be.

 
 
Decreased ability to maintain continuous operations.  

3.  Minimize efforts required for each task.

Eliminate the need for performing a task or operation over a long period of time by minimizing the number and range of required tasks, minimizing the time required to perform each task, and providing an appropriate amount of time for the next task to be accomplished (e.g., combine operations or make the operation automatic).

 

Decreased ability to overcome resistance.

 

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3.  Minimize need to overcome resistance
   
 

Provide appropriate mechanical force to replace manual operations, and match the degree of force to the magnitude of the operation.

Consider offering power-assist alternatives.


 
    Intermediate Motor Movement
     
PROBLEM   SOLUTION
Decreased ability to move and flex.  

Provide safe, comfortable, and convenient  locations for components.

Locate frequently used controls and/or components whithin the safety, comfort, and convenience range of the intermediate motor movements (e.g., locate the off/on switch in the handle of a vacuum sweeper to eliminate the need for bending).

Refer to existing anthropometric and range-of-movement charts and interpret the data appropriately.

     
Decreased ability to maintain continuous operations and over- come resistance.  
1.  Minimize the effort required for each task.
   
 

Eliminate the need for performing a task or operation over a long period of time.

Minimize the number and range of required tasks, and minimize the time required to perform each task (e.g., combine operations or make operations automatic).

Provide an appropriate amount of time to accommplish each task.

 
   
2.  Minimize or eliminate the need for manual operations.
 
   

Provide appropriate mechanical force to replace manual operation, and match the degree of force to the magnitude of the operation.

Consider offering power-assisted alternatives.

 
    3.  Minimize the need to flex joints.
 
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Locate frequently used controls and/or components within the safety, comfort, and convenience range of the intermediate motor movements (e.g., provide for frequently used items to be stored on the upper shelves or a refrigerator rather than on the lower shelves).

Refer to standard anthropometric and range-of-movement charts and interpret the data as appropriate..


 
    Large Motor Movement
     
PROBLEM   SOLUTION
Decreased ability to rotate, flex, and twist.  

Minimize the need  to rotate, flex, and twist hip, spine, and torso.

Minimize the number and range of required task movements that require rotating, flexing, and twisting of hips, spine, and torso.

Place frequently used controls and/or components in easy-to-use locations within the safety, comfort, and convenience range of the large motor movements.

Refer to the standard anthropometric and range-of-movement charts and interpret the data as appropriate.

 
Decreased ability to maintain continuous operations and overcome resistance.   1.  Minimize the effort required for each task.
   
 

Eliminate the need for performing a task or operation over a long period of time.

Minimize the number and range of required tasks and the time required to perform each task (e.g., combine operations or make operations automatic).

Provide an appropriate amount of time to accomplish each task.

 
    2.   Minimize or eliminate the need for manual operations.
     
    Provide appropriate mechanical force to replace manual operations, and match the degree of force to the magnitude of the operation. Consider offering power-assisted alternatives.
 
    3.  Minimize the need to flex joints.
     
Back to Top   Locate frequently used controls and/or operations within the safety, comfort, and convenience range of the large motor movements. Refer to standard anthropometric and range-of-movement charts and interpret data as appropriate.

 
    Combination Movement
     
PROBLEM   SOLUTION
Decreased ability to reach, squat,  lift, stoop, and knee.  

Facilitate the ability to reach, squat, lift, stoop, and kneel.

Minimize the number and range of task movements that are required for reaching, squatting, lifting, stooping, and kneeling.

Place frequently used cotrols andand/or operations within the safety, comfort, and convenience range of the large motor movements.

Refer to standard anthropometric and range-of-movement charts and interpret data as appropriate.

 
Decreased ability to walk, run, jog, and climb.  
1.  Facilitate the ability and/or need to walk, run, jog, and climb.
   
 

Minimize the number and range of task movements that are required for walking, running, jogging, and climbing.

Place frequently used cotrols and/or operations within the safety, comfort, and convenience range of the large motor movements.

Refer to standard anthropometric and range-of-movement charts and interpret data as appropriate.

Provide comfort in performing tasks; provide appropriate footware, devices, and other facilitating items; and provide an opportunity to practice appropriate movements prior to execution of the actual task.

 
   
2.  Minimize or eliminate the need for manual operations.
 
   

Provide appropriate mechanical force to replace manual operations; match the degree of force to the magnitude of the operation.

Consider offering power-assisted alternatives.

 
   
3.  Minimize the need to flex joints.
 
Back to Top  

Locate frequently used controls and/or operations within the safety, comfort, and convenience range of required motor movements.

Refer to standard anthopometric and range-of-movement charts and interpret data as appropriate.

 


Rationalizations can no longer excuse designs of products or environments that fail to attract and accommodate any segment of the population.



*Courtesy of "Guidelines and Strategies for Designing Transgenerational Products," was suported, in part, by Grant number 90-AT-0182, from the Administration OIffice of Human Development Services, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC 20201, and the All-University Gerontology Center, Syracuse University.

 
 
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